Beginner's Guide to Meditation: 60 minute version

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Beginner's Guide to Meditation: 60 minute version

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An excerpt:

There is no need to "do" anything while meditating. Rather it is more a process of "un-doing". During meditation, a chain of events will be released within you and you may have varied inner experiences, some of which you will understand intellectually, and some of which you may not. You may just experience a feeling of calmness, wholeness or tranquility. The most important thing is to simply do it, and allow yourself to experience your own unique meditation - and its many benefits.

Here’s the key: No matter how many thoughts play in your mind or how many different feelings surface, do not be daunted by them. Everyone has thoughts and feelings that play on the mind. When thoughts come up, as they will, simply acknowledge them, be grateful for them, then let them go… or you can imagine they are clouds floating by in the sky, high above you. Once you do that, just return to your breath and begin again… Long in-breath, long out-breath… You will likely have to do this throughout your meditation, which is normal. And rest assured, while doing this, you are meditating and benefitting 100% from all the good things it has to offer.

Here’s another important thing you should be aware of when meditating. The ability to think, to use our intellect and reasoning skills and make decisions based on ethics, is what makes us a unique species. However, one of the reasons why the ancient practice of meditation is so powerful is because it is a way for us to detach, for a while, from the ceaseless stream of conscious and unconscious thoughts that is the very nature of mind, so that after meditating and detaching from it for a while, we can return to it refreshed, energized, centered, and as a result, be far more efficient. In this way, meditation is to the brain what exercise is to the body. There are, however, two “I’s”, as in “I, me, my”, that are known to exist within us: the first is the “I” that is the “mind” which generates incessant thoughts (along with underlying fears and doubts), is insatiable, constantly demands more and more of us, and continually leads us to experience a perpetual state of unhappiness in the endless pursuit of the pleasures and distractions it demands. The second is the “I” that is the “higher self” or “true self”. It is the “observer” and not “generator” of thought, is centered on the values of love, truth, creativity, and compassion, and is connected to the source of all awareness. When we meditate, we connect with that source, deep within ourselves, whose perpetual state is that of peace and bliss. Another name for that “I” is: the “silent passenger”. Return to your breath now and become aware of your “silent passenger”. Just observe as thoughts come and go, and allow the waves of inner peace that arise within you to center you and fill you with joy and tranquility. Let's do that for a few moments now...