Overcoming Addiction Series, Part 2 of 3: "I am not my addiction." - 60 minute version

wallpapers 4.jpg
wallpapers 4.jpg
sale

Overcoming Addiction Series, Part 2 of 3: "I am not my addiction." - 60 minute version

0.00 16.95
Add To Cart

An excerpt:

Overcoming an addiction is one of the most challenging initiatives anyone can undertake, and those who are able to overcome their addiction are among the bravest and strongest in the world. By being here, you have already taken the first step in overcoming your addiction and releasing the negative impact it has had on your life. You have made a choice for the better – a heroic choice. You have set your INTENTION for a better FUTURE.

Congratulations on finding and acting from your inner strength. That’s amazing will-power! Take a moment now to thank yourself for that, and to acknowledge what a tremendous achievement it is in itself. Say inwardly, “Thank you, self, thank you for bringing my will forward and allowing me to act on it. I am strong. I chose health and wellness. I am so proud of having done this… If I can do this, I can do anything to get myself to total wellness… GREAT WORK!”  Just sit with that now for a few moments… and continue to focus on the breath coming into the body – and leaving the body.

Let’s continue now to breathe in and out, all the while focusing on the breath. Here’s some GREAT news: it's now been proven scientifically: our thoughts and actions are able to change our brain structure in ways that eliminate or alleviate anxiety, stress, compulsive behavior and addiction. The brain's ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections allows brain cells to adjust their activity in response to new situations or to changes in their environment, and it is through the process of meditation that we are able to make changes or modify habitual behaviors.

Simply put, meditation is the process of observing one’s own mind - one's own thoughts and feelings. When you observe them without becoming attached to them, you get to see them, as they say, “from 10,000 feet”. That means you get to see an overview of the patterns and habits that drive you – and the addictive behavior - from a detached viewpoint. The bottom line is: the more you become aware of how the addictive behavior has influenced you and the negative impact it’s had on your life, the less hold and effect it will have on you. Otherwise put, the pain we experience in our mind is different from how our brain responds to pain. When we can “watch ourselves watching our self”, we can begin to diminish the neurological impact of the addictive behaviour. And that’s the essence of meditation.

This is the part where most people give up when it comes to meditation: they simply can't get beyond the mental "chatter" they hear when they close their eyes to meditate - and assume, wrongly, that they're not meditating because they can't stop the chatter from happening. Here's the truth: no-one can stop the mental chattering! We learn to meditate IN SPITE of it - to get beyond the mental chatter - to observe it - and through meditation, to take a break from it - NOT to stop it. Once again, nobody can stop it. We can, however, in time, get better and better at meditating, and experience longer periods of time when the chatter ceases…